Tag Archives: ketones

Carbs: Low vs. Lower

 

 

This was met with much backlash from the low carb cavalry, because, well, if low is good then lower must be better

I’m not anti-keto; but I’m not anti-science.  FACT.  

 

“…some people are not genetically equipped to thrive in prolonged nutritional ketosis.” –Peter Attia

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Ketone bodies as signaling metabolites

*non sequiter*

One of the ways dietary carbohydrate contributes to liver fat is via ChREBP: “carbohydrate-response element binding protein.”  It responds to a glucose metabolite and activates transcription of lipogenic genes.  Insulin helps.  Ketones do the opposite (Nakagawa et al., 2013), by inhibiting the translocation of ChREBP into the nucleus where it does it’s dirty work:

 

ChREBP

 

More interestingly, ketones are histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi)… this leads to more histone acetylation.  Benefits of fasting sans fasting?  Modulating of acetylation is a MAJOR regulator of circadian rhythmicity.

Butyrate is another HDACi, so have some fibrous plant foods with your red wine and dark chocolate.  Anti-aging (mostly worm studies, but still).

 

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Ketoacidosis

Nutritional ketosis is a normal, physiological response to carbohydrate and energy restriction.  A ketogenic diet is an effective weight loss strategy for many.  Ketoacidosis, on the other hand, is a pathological condition caused by insulin deficiency.  The common theme is low insulin; however, in ketoacidosis, blood glucose levels are very high.  Ketone levels are elevated in both states, although are 10-20x higher in ketoacidosis (~0.5-2 vs. > 20 mM).  Nutritional ketosis and ketoacidosis should not be confused with one another, and a ketogenic diet doesn’t cause ketoacidosis.

In ketoacidosis, gluconeogenesis occurs at a very high rate and the lack of insulin prevents glucose disposal in peripheral tissues.  Skeletal muscle protein breakdown contributes gluconeogenic substrates, exacerbating the problem.  This can cause blood glucose to reach pathological levels, exceeding 250 mg/dL.

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Impact of a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet on gut microbiota.

NPR recently reported on a study where the participants ate either a meat-based, fiber-free ketogenic diet or a vegetarian diet and had their gut microflora analyzed.  The low carb diet was much higher in fat, and as such, increased the prevalence of a microbe involved in fat digestion.  “Bilophila.”  The article focused on this one and cited a 2012 study where Bilophila was associated with intestinal inflammation… however, the ketogenic diet increased the levels of Bacteroides and decreased Firmicutes.  These are the two that brought the whole gut microbe-obesity connection into the spotlight.  The microbiome in obese mice is characterized by low Bacteriodetes and high Firmicutes. Fecal transplants from obese mice to lean mice causes them to gain weight.  Little is known about Bilophila relative to Bacteriodetes & Firmicutes, and I suspect the focus was on Bilophila because the authors wanted something negative to say about a meat-based, fiber-free ketogenic diet, and that 2012 mouse study suggested Bilophila could be their answer.

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Dietary protein does not negatively impact blood glucose control.

“Dietary protein-derived amino acids have a purpose, and that purpose is not carbs.”

At a reasonable level of dietary intake, protein is used for the maintenance of organs & tissues.  Lean body mass.  It’s functional.  Protein isn’t stored in any appreciable capacity, and most excess is either oxidized or stored as glycogen.  Theoretically, about 50-60% of protein-derived amino acids can be converted into glucose, mathematically, but it’s not what you think…

“At a reasonable level of dietary intake.”  A recent publication took a look at this (Fromentin et al., 2013).   They set out to determine how much protein is converted to glucose under “optimal gluconeogenic conditions.”  That is, the subjects were 12 hours fasted, which is a physiologically relevant, optimal gluconeogenic condition.  They were then given 4 eggs (~23 g protein) that were labeled with two stable isotopes (15N & 13C, derived from hens fed isotope-enriched diets!).  Throughout the entire study duration, the subjects were infused with a third isotope, 2H-glucose.  By collecting and analyzing the enrichment of isotopically-labeled metabolites like expired CO2, urea, and glucose, the researchers were able to determine the fate of those 23 grams of protein.

Some of the dietary protein-derived amino acids were used for protein synthesis, others were oxidized.  But blood glucose levels did not change.  Nor did the rate of gluconeogenesis.

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