Category Archives: Sun

Artificial light regulates fat mass: no bueno.

“despite not eating more or moving less”

We’ve seen this time and time again: LIGHT IS A DRUG.

 

above quote is extrapolated from this rodent study: “Prolonged daily light exposure increases body fat mass through attenuation of brown adipose tissue activity.”

 

Artificial light impacts nearly every biological system, and it doesn’t even take very much to have an appreciable effect (think: checking your smart phone or watching a television show on your iPad in bed at night).  In this study, adding 4 hours to the usual 12 hours of light slammed the autonomic nervous system, disrupting sympathetic input into brown adipose leading to a significant increase in body fat  “despite not eating more or moving less.”

 

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LIGHT, Leptin, and Environmental Mismatch

For a long time, the melanocortin system was basically thought to control the color of skin and hair.  It still does, and many redheads are redheaded due to polymorphisms in one of the melanocortin receptors.

Fast forward to 2015: to make a long story short, melanocortins are HUGE players in circadian biology.

 

POMC ACTH a-MSH

 

Brief background (also see figure above):

Fed state -> high leptin -> a-MSH -> MC4R (the receptor for a-MSH) = satiety, energy production, fertility, etc.

Fasted state -> low leptin -> AgRP blocks MC4R = hunger, energy conservation, etc.

MC4R polymorphisms in humans are associated with obesity.  Melanotan II causes skin darkening (marketed as “photoprotection” [no bueno, imo]), enhanced libido, and appetite suppression.

 

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Dark Skies and Light Pollution

The mission of the International Dark-Sky Association is “to preserve and protect the night time environment and our heritage of dark skies through quality outdoor lighting.”  They’re all about stressing the importance of lighting on health, light pollution, and some really interesting stuff.

For more on the topic, check out their website, darksky.org, and Paul Bogard’s book, The End of Night: Searching for Natural Darkness in an Age of Artificial Light.

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Circadian Disruption Impairs Survival in the Wild

…just read that huge disasters, ranging from Exxon Valdez to Chernobyl, may have been due, in part, to ignorance of basic principles of circadian rhythms.  Gravitas.

 

circadian rhythms

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Entraining Central and Peripheral Circadian Rhythms

“Desynchronization between the central and peripheral clocks by, for instance, altered timing of food intake, can lead to uncoupling of peripheral clocks from the central pacemaker and is, in humans, related to the development of metabolic disorders, including obesity and type 2 diabetes.”

If you haven’t been following along, a few papers came out recently which dissect this aspect of circadian rhythms — setting the central vs. peripheral clocks.

In brief (1):  Central rhythms are set, in part, by a “light-entrainable oscillator (LEO),” located in the brain.  In this case, the zeitgeber is LIGHT.

Peripheral rhythms are controlled both by the brain, and the “food-entrainable oscillator (FEO),” which is reflected in just about every tissue in the body – and is differentially regulated in most tissues. In this case, the zeitgeber is FOOD.

In brief (2):  Bright light in the morning starts the LEO, and one readout is “dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO),” or melatonin secretion in the evening. Note the importance of timing (bright light *in the morning*) – if bright light occurs later in the day, DLMO is blunted: no bueno.

Morning bright light and breakfast (FEO) kickstart peripheral circadian rhythms, and one readout is diurnal regulation of known circadian genes in the periphery.  This happens differently (almost predictably) in different tissues: liver, a tissue which is highly involved in the processing of food, is rapidly entrained by food intake, whereas lung is slower.

Starting the central pacemarker with bright light in the morning but skimping on the peripheral pacemaker by skipping breakfast represents a circadian mismatch: Afternoon Diabetes? Central and peripheral circadian rhythms work together.  Bright light and breakfast in the morning.

 

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Mushrooms are awesome (P<0.05)

“Without leaves, without buds, without flowers;
Yet they form fruit.
As a Food, as a tonic, as a medicine;
The entire creation is precious.”

-weird mushroom poem of sketchy origin

 

Mushrooms: They have B12! When exposed to UV light, they make vitamin D2.  Protein, fibre, and selenium.  Shall I go on?

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Vitamin D, Fiat Lux, and Circadian Rhythms

Vitamin D synthesis is TEAMWORK!

Skin: 7-dehydrocholesterol + UVB = previtamin D3.
Liver: Previtamin D3 –> 25(OH)-Vitamin D3.
Kidney: 25(OH)-Vitamin D3 –> 1,25(OH)2-Vitamin D3 if you need it or 24,25(OH)2-Vitamin D3 if you don’t.

N.B. one of the major regulatory pathways occurs in skin: if you’re getting a lot of sunlight, then skin darkens to block this step.  Supplemental and dietary Vitamin D3 bypass this… but the dietary Vitamin D supply rarely produces toxicity because it’s not very abundant.  In other words, sunlight Vitamin D never reaches toxic levels.  Supps could (rare, but possible).

Disclaimer: I’m not against Vit D supps, but prefer sunlight whenever possible.

The other major regulatory step is in the kidney.  Production of 1,25(OH)2-Vitamin D3 is tightly regulated — so blood levels don’t decline until your very deficient… so 25(OH)-Vitamin D3 is a better indicator of skin production and dietary intake.

Disclaimer #2: this post is not about any of the pleiotropic effects of Vitamin D or D supps, which range in value from worthless to helpful to possibly harmful.

For some of that stuff, see:

Vitamin D: still a scam, still immunosuppressive… by Jane Plain

The Vitamin D seminar by Ivor Cummins

Vitamin D 101 by Kris Gunnars

The Vitamin D Debacle with Ivor Cummins and Sam Feltham

all of the above are more pro-D supps than me, which I find perfectly OK.

 

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